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Winnipeg Vape Expo

by CanadaEcigs.ca on 07/23/14

Winnipeg Vape Expo

Over 100 people visited the Vape Expo that was held at Winnipeg. The first annual expo was organized in Opera Ultra Lounge where vendors set up shops for selling vaporizers and e-juices. According to the vendors, the e-cigarettes market in the city had witnessed a tremendous growth in the recent times. Fat Panda Vapes currently operates from two locations in the city. The owners are planning to set up their next operations at Selkirk soon.

Tracey Cucchini, who heads one of Fat Panda Vapes’ operations, said that two guys who really wanted to give up tobacco cigarettes tried out electronic cigarettes. They soon realized the benefits and decided to help out other people who wanted to quit smoking. It is possible to fill vape electronic cigarettes flavored oils or nicotine and they emit mist or vapor.

Vape Expo

Josh McLeod who tried a vape electronic cigarette at the Winnipeg Expo said he succeeded in quitting tobacco cigarette smoking in about two years’ time because of e-cigarettes. Cucchini added that vape electronic cigarettes have been introduced in Canada very recently after the market for them picked up well in the United States and Europe. According to Cucchini, the demand for these products is growing fast because many people desperately want to quit smoking.

McLeod, a member of the group that meets regularly to vape as well as sell products, said that the group size has grown from 30 to 200. He added that this is a good group that people who are trying hard to give up smoking can be part of. McLeod also said that he started smoking at the age of 13 and that he used the vape electronic cigarettes to get rid of his tobacco smoking habit. According to him, the e-cigarettes have also helped him in reducing the amount of nicotine smoked.

However, medical experts continue to remain divided on the subject of safety of e-cigarettes. Further, authorities are not sure as to whether people could be allowed to smoke e-cigarettes indoors.

Are Electronic Cigarettes Really Safe?

by CanadaEcigs.ca on 04/24/14

Canadian man enjoying an electronic cigarette 

Electronic cigarettes are being marketed as the healthier way of smoking in public. However, nobody really knows how healthy these are because they haven't been around long enough.

Everybody has accepted that smoking cigarettes is bad for their health. The problem is that it's highly addictive and very difficult to give up. The thought of a non-harmful alternative sounds like heaven. Electronic cigarettes are in use by millions of people globally looking for a way to kick the habit. Electronic cigarettes do not produce smoke, they produce a vapour which can be inhaled. So, instead of smoking, you are vaping.

While e-cigarettes are becoming popular, they are also becoming controversial. The health effects of such products remains unclear. Consider for a second that smoking was once considered healthy, and was once prescribed by doctors for various ailments. Most of the controversial questions about electronic cigarettes concerns how safe they are for yourself, and others around you. People also have concerns that they aren't regulated in the same way as conventional cigarettes. As there is no age limit on purchasing an e-cig, some people have suggested that it could be the starting point to more harmful sources of nicotine by smoking.

Some countries and states in the USA are attempting to get tighter control and regulation over electronic cigarettes. There are talks of trying to banish people vaping to smoking shelters.

The problem is that people have accepted smoking regulation because of the danger to everyone nearby. There have been hundreds of studies into smoking and everyone accepts that it is dangerous. Smoking doesn't smell nice, is anti-social, can be dangerous and it can also cause all sorts of serious diseases.

Electronic cigarettes on the other hand look like a very clean and safe alternative. They don't smell, they won't catch fire if you drop them, and nobody else has to inhale your second hand smoke. This is the reason electronic cigarettes have so far managed to avoid the indoor smoking bans. This has caused confusion since all businesses have to decide their own policy regarding these electronic cigarettes.

A couple of months ago Health Canada commissioned a report looking into the number and safety concerns associated with e-cigarettes. At the moment, the popularity of these devices is booming. There are shops and websites specialising in selling the electronic cigarettes all over the world.

While most e-cigarettes are inexpensive and disposable, there are also some much more sophisticated models available. Handmade models can cost up to $400, and there's lots of people willing to pay this price. While these customised models are expensive and quite popular, there are some reports about them being unsafe or reliable. Some designers have not paid proper attention to the electronics. There have been some reports of the batteries exploding which is a concern.

The main reason people will consider buying an electronic cigarette is because it seems healthy. It is popular with people who know they shouldn't smoke, but can't give up. It is sold as a way to reduce the harmful products a smoker is exposed to.

An ecigarette uses a tiny battery to heat an element which vaporises a liquid which is then inhaled. The liquid used is propylene glycol, this is commonly used in fog machines, and also inside inhalers for people with asthma. This liquid is even used in hospitals as a way to clean the air. Propylene Glycol is not known to be harmful like tobacco smoke. However, it is a known irritant, so there are no guarantees that it is completely harmless. There are countless different flavors to choose from which are all made using food grade ingredients.

In Canada the electronic cigarettes just contain vapour and flavourings. However, in other countries it often contains a small measured amount of nicotine. Nicotine is what's addictive in cigarettes and is a stimulant. Canada has banned the sale of electronic cigarettes containing nicotine due to the doubts over the safety and addictiveness of such products. This is also because some people have suggested that electronic cigarettes could be a way for people to start smoking cigarettes.

The facts however look very different. The reason most people take up e-cigarettes is because they were smokers, or they are trying to give up. There have also been a number of studies by the US FDA who find that there are very low levels of toxins produced by e-cigarettes.

If any country wants to ban all tobacco products, then electronic cigarettes could certainly be used as a relatively safe alternative. However, at the moment Health Canada is not allowing the sale of nicotine containing electronic cigarettes. As they contain nicotine they fall under a medical category which can be regulated much closer.

It has been suggested that electronic cigarettes are not medical devices, or tobacco products and so fall under neither category. It could well be that there is pressure being applied by the tobacco industry to prohibit sale of electronic cigarettes.

Can e-cigarettes help smokers quit?

by CanadaEcigs.ca on 04/02/14

Ottawa man smokes an electronic cigarette

E-cigarettes have grown popular today considering the skyrocketing number of people who use them. Although they are often used by regular cigarette smokers as a tool for quitting smoking, they are not that effective as always presumed, according to a new study by the University of California, San Francisco. The study focused on 949 regular smokers, 88 of which reported they had used e-cigs within the last month.

Majority of the smokers intimated that they wanted to quit smoking one day, either after six months or thereafter. Smokers who used electronic cigarettes said they planned to quit smoking while a paltry 5% e-cig users said they had no plans of ever quitting, compared to 13% of participants who didn't use electronic cigarettes.

After one year, the participants were asked whether they had successfully managed to quit smoking. The quit rate results between the smokers and the e-cig users did not have a significant difference. Only 10.2% of the e-cig users said they had successfully quit smoking as compared to 13.8% of the regular smokers.

Dr. Pamela Ling, the study co-author says, "There are several stories of people claiming that e-cigs help them quit smoking, but our systematic study did not find a notable effect of electronic cigarettes on cessation." Such stories are just based on perceptions and theories. 

According to the study, there is a group of people who were more likely to use e-cigarettes. They include women, younger adults under 30 years of age and less educated people.

Although the study was small with only 88 e-cigarette users, the authors of the research say their study simply backs up previous findings of studies that e-cigs do not play a significant role in quitting smoking,

Ling adds, "Every credible information should be backed up by correct data and so the claims that e-cigarettes can help one quit smoking are not true as they don't have any data."

Most e-cigarette makers usually claim or suggest that e-cigs can help in smoking cessation to entice and attract potential consumers. The study acknowledges this dishonest approach and suggests that the government should come up with regulations to ban e-cigarette manufacturers that advance such claims.  

In the recent years, the popularity of electronic cigarettes has increasingly grown with various surveys recording a considerable increase in the number of individuals using the devices. One of the major reasons why many people like "vaping" on e-cigs is because it enables them to mimic smoking in areas where smoking is banned. Others love the exceptional vaping experience as they inhale the flavoured "juice" inside the e-cig and exhale the vapour.

Apart from researchers, public health officials have also raised concerns about the e-cigs. Many public health officials have noted that there are few studies that authenticate the ability of the devices to help smokers quit nor their safety when used.

The sale of e-cigs with nicotine-rich flavour cartridges is not allowed in Canada unless specifically authorized by the Health Canada. Although this federal agency has not authorized any manufacturer to produce e-cigarettes with nicotine-laced juice, this does mean that there are no unscrupulous e-cig retailers in Canada selling such products. Just as the Health Canada has the mandate of ensuring that illegal e-cigs are not sold in the market, the citizens also have a duty of ensuring that they don't buy such products. 

According to Melodie Tilson, the Non-Smokers' Rights Association director of policy, the fact that e-cigs are readily available poses a risk of enticing a new generation of smokers, considering the fact that one can easily find e-cigs with nicotine "juice" in the market

"We believe that electronic cigarettes are less harmful compared to cigarettes and can help smokers quit since they have no combustion or tobacco. However, there is no scientific evidence suggesting that they are completely safe to use," she added. Due to this, Tilson suggests that more studies should be conducted on the effectiveness and safety of electronic cigarettes as good smoking cessation aids.

Non-Smokers' Rights Association stresses that it would be logical to base their policies on much more credible studies that clearly show that electronic cigarettes can either help smokers quit or are basically nicotine patches that would be harmful to the body. So basically, rigorous study is what will unmask the hidden side of these devices.

Debate on the ban of nitotine-loaded cigarettes in Canada

by CanadaEcigs.ca on 03/20/14

Health Canada debates banning ecigs

Many public-health advocates in Canada have been calling on the government to enact stiffer laws on smoking. Nonetheless, Health Canada has made some vigorous attempts towards regulating smoking by banning nicotine-loaded e-cigarettes. It has also ordered a number of companies to stop selling such devices and asked Internet and credit card providers to cut links with these businesses.

In the past four years, more than 250 complaints about the sales of e-cigarettes have been brought to the attention of Health Canada with most of the companies in question ending up with cease-and-desist letters issued by the regulator.

Despite these enforcement attempts, public-health experts are divided on whether electronic cigarettes encourages real smoking or offer an effective alternative to tobacco without life-threatening side effects. Most electronic-cigarette businesses are advocating for a more legalized approach in the regulation of these devices, instead of bullying businesses.

The e-cigarettes are battery-powered devices which heat up a liquid containing nicotine and flavoring and turn it into vapor, thereby creating a smoking-like experience. Although it does not have the thousands of harmful chemicals associated with tobacco, it provides a hit of addiction just like other addictive drugs. 

In 2009, Health Canada barred the sale of nicotine-packed electronic cigarettes in Canada due to the risk of nicotine poisoning and addiction as well as irritation from the harmful propylene glycol liquid.

The regulator has vigorously applied its ban on e-cigarette sellers, seized or turned back imported products and ordered a sales halt in most of the cases it has handled. However, Health Canada has been criticized for a lackluster approach in enforcing its rules considering that no charges have been brought against any business.

The regulator has also reached to Internet-service providers with the aim of requesting them to stop hosting sites selling nicotine e-cigarettes, and asked credit card companies to cease handling the transactions of the retailers in question.

According to the Canadian Cancer Society, the trend risks hooking youth on nicotine and re-normalizing smoking. Deputy Chief medical officer, New Brunswick, has echoed these sentiments and called for a major crackdown. In fact, Nova Scotia has plans of enacting laws banning e-cigarette smoking indoors and sales to children.

But some experts and bodies are beginning to review their strong stance against e-cigarette smoking, such as the Canadian Lung Association.

Mr. Damphousse, who was instrumental in convincing the government to come up with graphic health warnings on all cigarette packages, added that e-cigarettes pose less health risks since they have less or no tobacco.

Many public-health advocates in Canada have been calling on the government to enact stiffer laws on smoking. Nonetheless, Health Canada has made some vigorous attempts towards regulating smoking by banning nicotine-loaded e-cigarettes. It has also ordered a number of companies to stop selling such devices and asked Internet and credit card providers to cut links with these businesses.

In the past four years, more than 250 complaints about the sales of e-cigarettes have been brought to the attention of Health Canada with most of the companies in question ending up with cease-and-desist letters issued by the regulator.

Despite these enforcement attempts, public-health experts are divided on whether electronic cigarettes encourages real smoking or offer an effective alternative to tobacco without life-threatening side effects. Most electronic-cigarette businesses are advocating for a more legalized approach in the regulation of these devices, instead of bullying businesses.

The e-cigarettes are battery-powered devices which heat up a liquid containing nicotine and flavoring and turn it into vapor, thereby creating a smoking-like experience. Although it does not have the thousands of harmful chemicals associated with tobacco, it provides a hit of addiction just like other addictive drugs. 

In 2009, Health Canada barred the sale of nicotine-packed electronic cigarettes in Canada due to the risk of nicotine poisoning and addiction as well as irritation from the harmful propylene glycol liquid.

The regulator has vigorously applied its ban on e-cigarette sellers, seized or turned back imported products and ordered a sales halt in most of the cases it has handled. However, Health Canada has been criticized for a lackluster approach in enforcing its rules considering that no charges have been brought against any business.

The regulator has also reached to Internet-service providers with the aim of requesting them to stop hosting sites selling nicotine e-cigarettes, and asked credit card companies to cease handling the transactions of the retailers in question.

According to the Canadian Cancer Society, the trend risks hooking youth on nicotine and re-normalizing smoking. Deputy Chief medical officer, New Brunswick, has echoed these sentiments and called for a major crackdown. In fact, Nova Scotia has plans of enacting laws banning e-cigarette smoking indoors and sales to children.

But some experts and bodies are beginning to review their strong stance against e-cigarette smoking, such as the Canadian Lung Association.

Mr. Damphousse, who was instrumental in convincing the government to come up with graphic health warnings on all cigarette packages, added that e-cigarettes pose less health risks since they have less or no tobacco.

Whether or not to regulate e-cigarette

by CanadaEcigs.ca on 02/15/14

 

Man using an e-cigarette

Electronic cigarette consumers have reacted angrily to the move by some countries to regulate electronic cigarettes with nicotine as they always consider this device as a better alternative to the nicotine-loaded tobacco cigarettes. In fact, the move only indicates that proper research about their health risks was never done.

Dr. Milan Khara, Tobacco Dependence Clinic Director at Vancouver Coastal Health Addiction Services, emphasizes this point by saying that, “some consumers consider e-cigarettes to be the ideal solution that can help them quit real cigarettes, but their long-term effects cannot be overlooked.”

"The fact that the e - cigarette vapour is less harmful as compared to smoke does not mean the vapour is completely harmless," adds Khara.

There is no conclusive evidence to suggest that e-cigarettes can pose health risks to users, but many countries have come up with some regulations for e-cigarettes. For example, according to Leslie Meerburg, Health Canada spokesperson, e-cigarettes with nicotine are considered to be drugs in Canada. The Food and Drugs Act requires manufacturers wishing to produce them to submit concrete scientific evidence demonstrating their safety, efficacy and quality to the Health Canada. Up to now, no company has been granted authorization to sell such products.

On the other hand, nicotine-free e-cigarettes can be sold in Canada as long as they meet the requirements of the Canada Consumer Product Safety Act. According to the act, companies must ensure that their products don't pose any safety or health risks to consumers. 

In Nova Scotia, Health Canada flexed its muscles slapping a nicotine-containing e-cigarette seller with a cease-and-desist directive for violating the requirements of the Food and Drugs Act. The local government of the province has also indicated that they would soon come up with e-cigarette regulations. The government has also served stores across the whole country with cease-and-desist letters, though most of them are resisting the government's move to ban the sale of nicotine-containing e-cigarettes. 

In Europe, nicotine-containing e-cigarette regulations vary according to location. A French court recently ruled that electronic cigarettes and tobacco products fall in the same category, so must also be sold by a registered tobacconist. However, the European Union allowed member countries to independently decide whether or not to regulate e-cigarettes.

In the US, the FDA (Food and Drug Administration) is responsible for regulating e-cigarettes sold as therapeutic devices. Although there is no regulation for other e-cigarettes at the moment, there is a proposal to regulate them too.

However, the FDA warns consumers that there is no conclusive evidence about the potential risks and benefits of e-cigarettes or about the amount of nicotine and other related chemicals being inhaled. The agency recently warned that it is unknown if electronic cigarettes can induce young users to try out tobacco cigarettes, which often cause diseases, leading to premature death.

Some states in the US have taken measures against the use of e-cigarettes, even before the FDA issues regulations. For example, New York City has prohibited the use of all kinds of e-cigarettes in public areas, such as bars, restaurants and parks. Some areas, such as Utah, North Dakota, California and Arkansas, have followed suit.