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Debate on the ban of nitotine-loaded cigarettes in Canada

by CanadaEcigs.ca on 03/20/14

Health Canada debates banning ecigs

Many public-health advocates in Canada have been calling on the government to enact stiffer laws on smoking. Nonetheless, Health Canada has made some vigorous attempts towards regulating smoking by banning nicotine-loaded e-cigarettes. It has also ordered a number of companies to stop selling such devices and asked Internet and credit card providers to cut links with these businesses.

In the past four years, more than 250 complaints about the sales of e-cigarettes have been brought to the attention of Health Canada with most of the companies in question ending up with cease-and-desist letters issued by the regulator.

Despite these enforcement attempts, public-health experts are divided on whether electronic cigarettes encourages real smoking or offer an effective alternative to tobacco without life-threatening side effects. Most electronic-cigarette businesses are advocating for a more legalized approach in the regulation of these devices, instead of bullying businesses.

The e-cigarettes are battery-powered devices which heat up a liquid containing nicotine and flavoring and turn it into vapor, thereby creating a smoking-like experience. Although it does not have the thousands of harmful chemicals associated with tobacco, it provides a hit of addiction just like other addictive drugs. 

In 2009, Health Canada barred the sale of nicotine-packed electronic cigarettes in Canada due to the risk of nicotine poisoning and addiction as well as irritation from the harmful propylene glycol liquid.

The regulator has vigorously applied its ban on e-cigarette sellers, seized or turned back imported products and ordered a sales halt in most of the cases it has handled. However, Health Canada has been criticized for a lackluster approach in enforcing its rules considering that no charges have been brought against any business.

The regulator has also reached to Internet-service providers with the aim of requesting them to stop hosting sites selling nicotine e-cigarettes, and asked credit card companies to cease handling the transactions of the retailers in question.

According to the Canadian Cancer Society, the trend risks hooking youth on nicotine and re-normalizing smoking. Deputy Chief medical officer, New Brunswick, has echoed these sentiments and called for a major crackdown. In fact, Nova Scotia has plans of enacting laws banning e-cigarette smoking indoors and sales to children.

But some experts and bodies are beginning to review their strong stance against e-cigarette smoking, such as the Canadian Lung Association.

Mr. Damphousse, who was instrumental in convincing the government to come up with graphic health warnings on all cigarette packages, added that e-cigarettes pose less health risks since they have less or no tobacco.

Many public-health advocates in Canada have been calling on the government to enact stiffer laws on smoking. Nonetheless, Health Canada has made some vigorous attempts towards regulating smoking by banning nicotine-loaded e-cigarettes. It has also ordered a number of companies to stop selling such devices and asked Internet and credit card providers to cut links with these businesses.

In the past four years, more than 250 complaints about the sales of e-cigarettes have been brought to the attention of Health Canada with most of the companies in question ending up with cease-and-desist letters issued by the regulator.

Despite these enforcement attempts, public-health experts are divided on whether electronic cigarettes encourages real smoking or offer an effective alternative to tobacco without life-threatening side effects. Most electronic-cigarette businesses are advocating for a more legalized approach in the regulation of these devices, instead of bullying businesses.

The e-cigarettes are battery-powered devices which heat up a liquid containing nicotine and flavoring and turn it into vapor, thereby creating a smoking-like experience. Although it does not have the thousands of harmful chemicals associated with tobacco, it provides a hit of addiction just like other addictive drugs. 

In 2009, Health Canada barred the sale of nicotine-packed electronic cigarettes in Canada due to the risk of nicotine poisoning and addiction as well as irritation from the harmful propylene glycol liquid.

The regulator has vigorously applied its ban on e-cigarette sellers, seized or turned back imported products and ordered a sales halt in most of the cases it has handled. However, Health Canada has been criticized for a lackluster approach in enforcing its rules considering that no charges have been brought against any business.

The regulator has also reached to Internet-service providers with the aim of requesting them to stop hosting sites selling nicotine e-cigarettes, and asked credit card companies to cease handling the transactions of the retailers in question.

According to the Canadian Cancer Society, the trend risks hooking youth on nicotine and re-normalizing smoking. Deputy Chief medical officer, New Brunswick, has echoed these sentiments and called for a major crackdown. In fact, Nova Scotia has plans of enacting laws banning e-cigarette smoking indoors and sales to children.

But some experts and bodies are beginning to review their strong stance against e-cigarette smoking, such as the Canadian Lung Association.

Mr. Damphousse, who was instrumental in convincing the government to come up with graphic health warnings on all cigarette packages, added that e-cigarettes pose less health risks since they have less or no tobacco.